Monday, January 28, 2013

Is Adair Getting To Be a Softie?

Still thinking about the Witch Sisters... I saw the first review posted for it on Amazon. The reviewer said she was surprised that, in the story, Adair wasn't quite the same badass that he was in The Taker and she (I'm assuming the reviewer is a she, maybe that's sexist of me) was wondering if this was inconsistent with his nature.

I don't see it as an inconsistency, no. One thing you should remember is that we don't hear Adair in his own words in The Taker. We only see him through Lanny's eyes. You first get his point of view (or POV) in The Reckoning and now again in the novella. I think if you look back over his behavior in The Reckoning, you'll see that he believes himself to be quite logical and even fair-minded. Once he forms an opinion on a matter, however, it's very hard to get him to change his mind, and when someone does something contrary to what he thinks is right, that's when the trouble starts. But he doesn't see himself as an ogre or a badass. He knows he loses his temper, and sometimes regrets it.

I will add, as an aside, that the book blog Paranormal Book Club chose him as the Best Villain of 2012. Yes, we are very proud.

Tell me what you think about Adair. Do you like getting his POV in The Reckoning? Was there anything that surprised you?

(By the way, an alert reader, Michelle, pointed out that The Witch Sisters is also free on Kobo.

If you'd like to see Amazon drop the price on Kindle, you can help by reporting it to their price-matching department. The link to that is in the Product Details section of the Witch Sisters page, right before Customer Reviews. You can use the Kobo link as proof that it's being offered for free elsewhere.)

6 comments:

  1. Alma, the reviewer is right that Adair seems a kinder gentler version of his Taker self, BUT, even if we knew his POV in The Taker, I would assume that his wickedness was an evolution of indulgences, luxuries and gratifications over his long life. And since I did read The Reckoning I agree with your assessment of him. It wasn't until he looked at himself through Lanny's eyes that he thought there was anything wrong.
    Thanks for the freebie too :)
    deb

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    1. Debbie, Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I think I patterned him after some men I know. Not the most self-aware :-) I think Smexy Books is going to run a character interview with him. It's a post-Descent interview and I'll be curious to see what fans think of it.

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  2. I was trying to get up the courage to ask a similar question about Adair's nature after reading the Witch Sister's. Now the POV comment kinda blew my mind. I completely overlooked it. Thinking about it it makes me question how I see *both* Lanore and Adair...

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    1. That was one of the fun things about getting to include Adair's POV in The Reckoning. As for Lanny, I didn't try to deliberately make her an "unreliable narrator" but we all have our blind spots and things we're headstrong about. There are things she doesn't see about herself, especially when she's a young girl, and things she doesn't grasp about Jonathan and Adair. And both men are kind of oblivious about certain things about themselves. Oh, human nature!

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  3. What about Johnathan? I'm interested in seeing him after he meets his wife honestly. As a reader we see Lanore's idealised vision of him, and get glimpses of his unhappiness but we never truly see who he is fully. Even after he comes back Adair remarks to himself that Johnathan's mysteriousness is practically a character trait. He can still slip out of any situation he doesn't want to be cornered into.

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    1. He, too, is based on a man I know. He is maddening. Yes, you can pity me :-)

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